power games a political history of the olympics

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Power Games

Author : Jules Boykoff
ISBN : 9781784780739
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 71. 15 MB
Format : PDF
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A timely, no-holds barred, critical political history of the modern Olympic Games The Olympics have a checkered, sometimes scandalous, political history. Jules Boykoff, a former US Olympic team member, takes readers from the event’s nineteenth-century origins, through the Games’ flirtation with Fascism, and into the contemporary era of corporate control. Along the way he recounts vibrant alt-Olympic movements, such as the Workers’ Games and Women’s Games of the 1920s and 1930s as well as athlete-activists and political movements that stood up to challenge the Olympic machine. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Power Politics And The Olympic Games

Author : Alfred Erich Senn
ISBN : 0880119586
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 66. 35 MB
Format : PDF
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Traces the history of the modern Olympic games, and looks at boycotts, performance enhancing drugs, judging controversies, corporate sponsorships, and international rivalries

The Politics Of The Olympic Games

Author : Richard Espy
ISBN : 0520043952
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 61. 82 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Olympic Politics

Author : Christopher R. Hill
ISBN : 0719044510
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 29. 96 MB
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Investigates the role of politics in Olympic history, examines problems facing the Olympic movement, and speculates about its future

Drug Games

Author : Thomas M. Hunt
ISBN : 9780292739574
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 57. 51 MB
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On August 26, 1960, twenty-three-year-old Danish cyclist Knud Jensen, competing in that year's Rome Olympic Games, suddenly fell from his bike and fractured his skull. His death hours later led to rumors that performance-enhancing drugs were in his system. Though certainly not the first instance of doping in the Olympic Games, Jensen's death serves as the starting point for Thomas M. Hunt's thoroughly researched, chronological history of the modern relationship of doping to the Olympics. Utilizing concepts derived from international relations theory, diplomatic history, and administrative law, this work connects the issue to global political relations. During the Cold War, national governments had little reason to support effective anti-doping controls in the Olympics. Both the United States and the Soviet Union conceptualized power in sport as a means of impressing both friends and rivals abroad. The resulting medals race motivated nations on both sides of the Iron Curtain to allow drug regulatory powers to remain with private sport authorities. Given the costs involved in testing and the repercussions of drug scandals, these authorities tried to avoid the issue whenever possible. But toward the end of the Cold War, governments became more involved in the issue of testing. Having historically been a combined scientific, ethical, and political dilemma, obstacles to the elimination of doping in the Olympics are becoming less restrained by political inertia.

The Games A Global History Of The Olympics

Author : David Goldblatt
ISBN : 9780393254112
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 88. 46 MB
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The definitive sports and social history of the modern Olympic games—by a New York Times best-selling sportswriter. A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 For millions of people around the world, the Summer and Winter Games are a joy and a treasure, but how did they develop into a global colossus? How have they been buffeted by—and, in turn, affected by—world events? Why do we care about them so much? From the reinvention of the Games in Athens in 1896 to Rio in 2016, best-selling sportswriter David Goldblatt brilliantly traces their history through national triumphs and tragedies, individual victories and failures. Here is the story of grand Olympic traditions such as winners’ medals, the torch relay, and the eternal flame. Here is the story of popular Olympic events such as gymnastics, the marathon, and alpine skiing (as well as discontinued ones like tug-of-war). And here in all their glory are Olympic icons from Jesse Owens to Nadia Comaneci, Abebe Bikila to Bob Beamon, the Dream Team to Usain Bolt. Hailed in the Wall Street Journal for writing about sports “with the expansive eye of a social and cultural critic,” Goldblatt goes beyond the medal counts to tell how women fought to be included in the Olympics on equal terms, how the wounded of World War II led to the Paralympics, and how the Olympics reflect changing attitudes to race and ethnicity. He explores the tensions between the Games’ amateur ideals and professionalization and commercialism in sports, the pitched battles between cities for the right to host the Games, and their often disappointing economic legacy. And in covering such seminal moments as Jesse Owens and Hitler at Berlin in 1936, the Black Power salute at Mexico City in 1968, the massacre of Israeli athletes at Munich in 1972, and the Miracle on Ice at Lake Placid in 1980, Goldblatt shows how prominently the modern Olympics have highlighted profound domestic and international conflicts. Illuminated with dazzling vignettes from over a century of the Olympics, this stunningly researched and engagingly written history captures the excitement, drama, and kaleidoscopic experience of the Games.

Passion Of The People

Author : Tony Mason
ISBN : 0860914038
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 61. 24 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Brazil's victory in the 1994 World Cup is the latest chapter in an extensive history of the world's most popular game in South America. In this engaging account, Tony Mason reviews the place of football in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Mason opens with soccer's rise at the turn of the century amidst the exploding urbanization of Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. He demonstrates that, from its beginnings, the game had wide popular appeal and examines the role of British commercial and military interests as well as that of newcomers from Italy, Spain and Portugal. From the moment when Uruguay won the Olyimpic football tournament in 1924 to Argentina's bizarre appearance in the World Cup final of 1990, international success on the pitch brought with it prestige and influence abroad. At home, Mason shows how dictators used football to ensure political passivity. He concludes by asking if the attention focused on football in Latin America today is exaggerated or whether the game truly is the 'passion of the people'.

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